Nov 262009
 

De Nile is much more than a river in Egypt, in fact denial is a river of discontent flowing through the coalition parties in Australian politics which this week has broken its banks.
Denial is what articles such as Samantha Maiden’s in today’s OZ simply shrieks out.


I watched 7:30 Report’s interview with Kevin Andrews and a portrait piece on Charles Wilson Tuckey last night. Two extremely disgruntled backbenchers, one fed up to the back teeth with what he sees as small ‘l’ liberalism in Malcolm Turnbull, while the other appears to have a personal vendetta against his party leader which knows no bounds, rationality or logic. I’d love to know just why Wilson hates Malcolm so much, but given that it’s Wilson at issue, perhaps there is no genuine rationale, just the voices in Wilson’s fevered mind.
What is patently clear though, is that a dedicated conservative cadre within the Liberal Party of Australia has begun to awaken from its slumber on the backseats, realised that they aren’t in Kansas anymore, and want to know just who this ‘liberal’ person is driving the bus. This whole business of conservative ideology opposing liberal ideology makes for great political theatre but at the end of the day, in-fighting with the Liberal Party being played out on the national stage is not a good look for a party looking to get back into government. Nor is it conducive to sound democratic government, because right now, we have no effective opposition to an all-powerful government except for the Senate, which remains as Paul Keating described it, an unrepresentative swill. We’ve seen what happens when a government holds too much power, which the Howard government did in control of both houses. In the current scenario, we have a government in control of the lower house, and a flock of headless chickens and their attendant fleas in the upper house.
Kudos to the Rudd government for the politically masterful hand played throughout this CPRS scenario. The government has effectively guaranteed themselves a second term, by default, because there is no other viable alternative. Is that good government? I don’t think so, somehow