Jun 052008
 

I think not, somehow.

When I first spotted this rather disgustingly expressed sentiment, my first thought was, "how amusing….someone using Pythonesque humour to pass a message",
followed immediately by, "hang on a mo…" as I reached for the camera which is my constant companion.

I think the transfer is in extremely bad taste, decidedly un-funny, not to mention an overt display of xenophobia on the part of the vehicle’s owner. Equally, if not more disturbing is the coal-scuttle style helmet on a stylised skull, sitting right alongside the map & words. The inference and relationship is clear. We’ll all pass snide innuendo over such expressions, and I know the red-neck element exists in this country (only too well, as exhibited in the OzSphere), but I still find such overt displays to be shocking. I guess that’s what the transfer is designed to do, but it’s purpose is also to send a message. A very abrupt, latently violent message of gross intolerance.

The Australia this sticker purports to support is not the Australia I live in. It’s another Australia, reminiscent of the 1930’s and ‘White Australia’. The one my grandparents inhabited, and the attitudes they instilled into my parents. It’s not an Australia I’m at all keen to see perpetuated. I’m driven to wonder who makes these things. Who sells them? What do the buyers of such material think they’re telling everyone else, apart from, "I’m a fuckwit, and this display proves it"

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  2 Responses to “Tongue-in-Cheek?”

  1. Apart from the factual inexactitude, errr….
    On tuther hand, I’d rather those so inclined made themselves openly visibkle, it’s when they’re forced into the woodwork that the real damage is done.

  2. Apart from the factual inexactitude, errr….
    On tuther hand, I’d rather those so inclined made themselves openly visibkle, it’s when they’re forced into the woodwork that the real damage is done.